Project Summary: The Open Anthology of Earlier American Literature


  • administrators

    Hi everyone! We’ve made HUGE progress on filling out our TOC with your suggestions over the past couple of weeks, so thank you to everyone who has contributed & agreed to author an introduction (or several)!

    We’d love to get the last few authors covered if we can, so if you know of anyone at your institution or in your network that might be interested in chipping in, please share the TOC and encourage them to get involved.

    Thanks again, we’re so pleased to be working with you all! @trobbins1981 and I will be in touch next week with next steps.



  • Hi, everyone. I just found out about this project via the UPenn site and would be interested in being involved if there is still a need for editorial help or contributors!


  • administrators

    Thanks @gaynord001, we’d love to have you contribute! We’re still looking for people to write introductions for various authors, and choose the texts from each author to be included. Check out the TOC spreadsheet to see if any of them line up with your interests, and let me know if you have any questions.



  • Dear colleagues and Open Anthology contributors,

    First thing’s first: a warning. Over the next few months, I’m certain to shower you with praise for your willingness to contribute to the project. Here’s the first sprinkle: thank you, you’re wonderful!

    I am delighted to say that we’ve been overwhelmed with responses from volunteers wanting to write author biographies and text introductions. Delighted!

    Putting this early enthusiasm behind us, here’s some initial direction. If you haven’t done so, you’re still free to peruse the author and work spreadsheet, which lays out our remaining needs in terms of authors and texts, and digitally pencil in your name along with any thoughts or suggestions.

    If you’ve already signed up to write an introduction to one or several of the authors covered in the anthology, I’ll encourage (implore!) you to join our new thread for contributor discussion on the Rebus Community forum. Zoe’s designed the forum to give us a space to talk through our work together as we get the project off of the ground. Dialogue will be especially crucial for the groups of two or three who’ve signed up to tag team certain authors and texts.

    As far as your “requirements” for writing an introduction, here’s what you need to know:

    Purpose
    Since all have likely encountered, read, and/or taught their fair share of commercial literature anthologies, I haven’t a doubt that our contributors understand the makeup of a successful author introduction. For starters, let’s say there are four basic requirements:

    • Biography: years born and deceased, places lived, relevant details.
    • Career: an overview of the author’s works with brief descriptions.
    • Context: their place in literary history, in literature movements, among different political and social milieus.
    • Comparison: a comparative gesture to other authors and works in the anthology.

    Between these bullet points, there is no real specific order, and, of course, there’s much overlap in their aims and descriptions. But I think it is safe to say that the best introductions touch on all of these elements in an effort to give undergraduate readers the fullest and most relevant picture possible of a given author.

    In terms of “fullest,” however, we don’t mean “longest.” In fact, it’s best to lean on the side of brevity. Students can locate interesting tidbits about an author’s family on Wikipedia—but that sort of trivia might not prove relevant for the teaching of that author. Ultimately, I trust your judgment.

    Finally, the purpose of this anthology is in its very title: Open! “Open” means more than a resource made free and online. In its best iteration, “open pedagogy” entails the spread of access to knowledge with an invitation to participate in the re-creation of new knowledge. Our biographies are just that: invitations to future students, scholars, and teachers to engage, sample, revise, and remix in the open and collaborative production of knowledge. How you signal “openness” in your biography—or if you choose to do so—is totally up to you. I have unceasing faith in your good judgment and dedication to the project.

    Word count
    Aim for around 750-1500 words.

    Due date
    Please aim to submit your introduction(s) by Friday, July 21st.

    Format & Submission
    Please share your introduction in an editable Word or Google document. Files can be sent to zoe@rebus.community.

    Texts & Excerpts
    If you are helping to locate texts to be included in the anthology, here’s what you need to know.

    Location
    Paul Royster of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has graciously invited us to use any of the materials from his series of Electronic Texts in American Studies, online at http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/etas/.

    All texts are public domain. We’re free to use or adapt any of his editorial notes as well, and to apply a CC license if desired.

    Required Info
    Please include in your submission:

    Title
    Author name
    The anthology section it belongs in
    The chapter it belongs in (if not just the author name)
    Your name (so we can credit you!)
    A link to the source text
    The text or section of text to be included (lightly edited and formatted as necessary)

    Due date
    Please submit your text(s) by Friday, July 21st.

    Format & Submission
    Please share your texts in an editable Word or Google document. Files can be sent to zoe@rebus.community.

    Finally, please do not hesitate to email me or address the forum with any questions, ideas, or concerns that arise during the process.

    All the best,

    Tim



  • The updates just get more and more exciting!!



  • To You, You Early American Heroes of the Summer,

    Greetings! I hope everyone has had some semblance of a chance to enjoy the summer “break.”

    I’ve been having more and more discussions with contributors as of late, and I even managed to look at a few initial drafts. This is shaping up to be a really exciting venture and volume. Thank you again for supporting it.

    Now, I figure this is as good a time as any to “check in” officially.

    So, the most typical question asked thus far has to do with the deadline. We set the date to July 21, which is now less than a week away – FYI: it’s this Friday. (Yes, this means the fall semester is in a month. It’s going to be okay, though. SOLIDARITY!)

    Regarding the anthology, some have already alerted me to pressing deadlines, pesky conferences, neglected travel plans, and/or other life stuff that’s going to interfere. Please, don’t apologize or feel bad about that. Aren’t all deadlines aspirational, to some degree? If you can drop me a line to let me know how your entries are shaping up, though, I’d much appreciate it!

    For now, allow me run down some of the other questions I’ve fielded this past week:

    Q: What’s up with these “incomplete” introductions? Where can I find them?
    A: All introductions labeled “incomplete” originated from Robin DeRosa’s students’ work on the initial anthology here. Some of these texts might be in need of a complete overhaul. If you have specific questions about the entries, please don’t hesitate to ask.
    Q: Do you have an example of a completed entry I can use as a model?
    A: Why certainly! A fabulous group of students from my survey course last fall composed the anthology entry on Roger Williams. Does that help?
    Q: Can I use a text that’s not found on Paul Royster’s Electronic Texts in American Studies?
    A: Of course! Also, if you are having difficulty tracking down a particular text, please let me know so I can give a hand.

    Q: Um…what did you want from me again?
    A: This is not passive aggressive – personally, I am all about accepting one million tasks and then forgetting what it was I’ve actually agreed to do. I’ve copied the original “instructions” below.
    Have a wonderful week! I hope to hear from you soon.

    Purpose
    Since all have likely encountered, read, and/or taught their fair share of commercial literature anthologies, I haven’t a doubt that our contributors understand the makeup of a successful author introduction. For starters, let’s say there are four basic requirements:
    • Biography: years born and deceased, places lived, relevant details.
    • Career: an overview of the author’s works with brief descriptions.
    • Context: their place in literary history, in literature movements, among different political and social milieus.
    • Comparison: a comparative gesture to other authors and works in the anthology.
    Between these bullet points, there is no real specific order, and, of course, there’s much overlap in their aims and descriptions. But I think it is safe to say that the best introductions touch on all of these elements in an effort to give undergraduate readers the fullest and most relevant picture possible of a given author.
    In terms of “fullest,” however, we don’t mean “longest.” In fact, it’s best to lean on the side of brevity. Students can locate interesting tidbits about an author’s family on Wikipedia—but that sort of trivia might not prove relevant for the teaching of that author. Ultimately, I trust your judgment.
    Finally, the purpose of this anthology is in its very title: Open! “Open” means more than a resource made free and online. In its best iteration, “open pedagogy” entails the spread of access to knowledge with an invitation to participate in the re-creation of new knowledge. Our biographies are just that: invitations to future students, scholars, and teachers to engage, sample, revise, and remix in the open and collaborative production of knowledge. How you signal “openness” in your biography—or if you choose to do so—is totally up to you. I have unceasing faith in your good judgment and dedication to the project.
    Word count
    Aim for around 750-1500 words.
    Due date
    Please aim to submit your introduction(s) by Friday, July 21st.
    Format & Submission
    Please share your introduction in an editable Word or Google document. Files can be sent to zoe@rebus.community.
    Texts & Excerpts
    If you are helping to locate texts to be included in the anthology, here’s what you need to know.
    Location
    Paul Royster of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has graciously invited us to use any of the materials from his series of Electronic Texts in American Studies, online at http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/etas/.
    All texts are public domain. We’re free to use or adapt any of his editorial notes as well, and to apply a CC license if desired.
    Required Info
    Please include in your submission:
    Title
    Author name
    The anthology section it belongs in
    The chapter it belongs in (if not just the author name)
    Your name (so we can credit you!)
    A link to the source text
    The text or section of text to be included (lightly edited and formatted as necessary)
    Due date
    Please submit your text(s) by Friday, July 21st.
    Format & Submission
    Please share your texts in an editable Word or Google document. Files can be sent to zoe@rebus.community.
    Finally, please do not hesitate to email me or address the forum with any questions, ideas, or concerns that arise during the process.
    All the best,
    Tim



  • Hello, my name is Colleen Tripp, and I would be happy to contribute to the anthology! I hold a PhD in American Studies from Brown University and am currently an assistant professor in the English department at Cal State Northridge. I have previous experience in open-source textbooks. Last year, I was one of a few media curators for the American Yawp, an open-source American history textbook. I would be interested in taking on the Sui Sin Far introduction and research.



  • Hello, my name is Lisa Culpepper and I would like to complete the introduction and research for Charlotte Perkins Gilman. I just added my name to the spreadsheet but after reading the previous post, I understand the first deadline is today. I am flexible and happy to contribute in any way I can.


  • administrators

    @colleen.tripp Hi Colleen, welcome to the Rebus Community! We’d love if you could take on the Sui Sin Far intro. I see that you’ve already added your name to the TOC spreadsheet, which is fantastic. I’d suggest that you take a look at the guidelines for contributors, if you haven’t already done so. @trobbins1981 and I will be happy to answer any questions you may have!

    We can chat more about deadlines, but is sometime around September 4th amenable to you?


  • administrators

    @lisa.napoleon8507 Hi Lisa, welcome to the Rebus community! We’d love to have you involved, could you tell me a little more about yourself?

    The deadline was set for our first bit of content, but we’re hoping to have a second (or third!) round in the upcoming weeks. So I hope that clarifies some of your concerns!


  • administrators

    @colleen.tripp I noticed that you emailed my colleague @zoe, who should be in touch soon!



  • Hello, My name is Leanne, and I’m a graduate student in the English and Film Studies Department at U Alberta; I’m also part of the copy editing team at Feral Feminisms. If you need any additional proofreading or copy editing for this project, I’d love to help.


  • administrators

    @leanne Hi Leanne, that’s great to hear! We’re in the early stages of receiving and formatting content, but should move on to proofreading/copyediting soon. I’ll be in touch when we get to this stage.



  • @apurva Great!



  • @apurva Hello again! I was just curious to know where this project is at, and if you’re still in need of any proofreaders or copy-editors. Thanks!


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